Category Archives: Adult Fiction

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

First Paragraph of Book: My name is Kathy H. I am thirty-one years old and I’ve been a carer for over eleven years. That sounds long enough, I know, but actually they want me to go on for another eight months, until the end of this year. That’ll make it almost exactly twelve years.

"I'm gonna win the Pul-Pul-Pulit-Pulitzer prize! There! I said it!"

Review: I first encountered this book in grade twelve when it was recommended to me by my English teacher for an essay. I read the first line and immediately put the book back down. My thoughts were: This book is garbage and sounds like a poorly read seven-year old wrote it… or like the epilogue of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.  In all honesty, the only reason I gave this book a second chance was because I heard a movie adaptation would be coming out starring Andrew Garfield, who I adore. While I strongly disagree with how Ishiguro chose to begin this novel, I strongly urge others to push past the opening and continue on with the novel.

Never Let Me Go tells the story of a specific sub-section of society that are raised with the knowledge that they will eventually be required to donate all their vital organs and will likely never see their 30th birthdays. Specifically it follows Kathy H. who attends Hailsham, a sort of Harvard among the other boarding schools for these types of children.

In a hipster world this would be ironic. and therefore amazing.

Kathy is a protagonist that prefers to take a more passive role in life as a student in Hailsham. Her most outlandish action as a child is befriending Tommy, a boy rejected by his peers for consistently throwing raging temper tantrums and being bad at art. Yes, bad at art. People in Hailsham have giant hard-ons for art, and students who can draw little more than stick figures are mocked. While Tommy doesn’t become better at art until he leaves the school, he manages to keep his temper in check and become accepted by his peers. He even does one better and begins to date Kathy’s best friend Ruth. Despite the fact that Kathy likes Tommy, on Ruth’s request, she spends her efforts on keeping Ruth and Tommy together.

Kathy is not a fighter. As a character she comes off as doormat and often I couldn’t tell if she was ridiculously self-sacrificing or simply too cowardly to pursue her own goals. But somehow, as a character she is still likeable. While she is essentially Ruth’s bitch for a large portion of the novel, she also has moments where she can be cruel, or be as frustrated with herself as the reader is with her. The best thing about this novel, besides the cool faux-utopian plot, are the characters. Kathy H. may be the main point of view but her relationships with the others are so realistic and well-developed that even the minor characters have the positive and negative traits that make each person uniquely human.

It is these traits that make the novel so beautiful and sad.  It’s impossible to move people with a book driven almost entirely by plot with flat, neglected characters. I like this novel because the characters are so human and real that by the end Kathy H. becomes more than the thirty-one year old carer we were introduced to in the beginning, she becomes as real as anyone you might meet on the street.

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Filed under Adult Fiction, Book Reviews, Coming of Age, Faux-Utopia, Romance